Muliticultirsm in Canada Academic Essay

Muliticultirsm in Canadahttps://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/ apa please purdue owl APAPg 7 first line is confusing pg 8 what is IFF and GBA P8 needs an example of how first nations voiced public policy and has not been been recognized treaties signed by colonist. Pg9 end the paragaraph with for eaxample. and jumps into with people who are disabled It is important to indicate that First Nations have had many obstacles such as living on reseves and their schooling sytem they are continously being opressednext Module 3 second quesitonSome parts of Canada muslims may feel they are not part of the canadian society however Canada is a multicultural society and many idnividuals adopt their traditional persective to canadian society The only issue has been with muslims is the burqa in Quebec and how individuals should not be wearing in citizenship cermonies and turbans in policy departments however all this has been quashed Canada doesnt make an individual choose between ones culture vs canadian culture in order to fit in . That may have occured in the past but it is very mininmal or not at all it would be interesting if there was two point past and present of views in last question================================================================= 8/16 7:00 PM I complained that the stance that the individual is taking in the last essay is not at all what Canada feels Canada endives their multicultural policy and at no point do any ethnic individuals feel like they are terrosit I had uploaded readings I told them my concerns about the last question Apa citing is wrong too and I provided the link to the appropriate site Yea Canada doesnt think Muslims are terrosit and we take our multicultural society very seriously and writer needs to fine another article to had each question should have 3 articles eachI have indicated so many times The link to Apa formatting is Purdue owl apa And I had provided everything from my class reading and I had cinducted research for the first two questions and I was informed the writer does that so I provided my class reading for module three questions and hoping the staff would do research I also had provided professor expectation Please make sure this isnt plagirzed the Apa format was wrong and the perpective of last question was not correct .. I will look again in th articles for the classs to send u For the last questions .. Canada is truly a multicultural society and they accept everyones traditions 08/24 the last question is a disaster there are some stats no documention, there are gramatical problems most importantly no citing if someone states islamphobia where did they get this ? the APA cting is all wrong i have corrected them all myself last question on discrimination on muslms does not have proper citation when you quote stats you have indicate where you obtained this i will send you what i corrected last question is a disaster the other stuff i corrected myself you have only used one paper- i need at least two articles per questions I am sorry but in 3 or 4th level university writing no one writes saying the same thing said by socioloy pg 10 of essay I attached the document SOciiology74598_final_paper.doc page 11 of document uses gladly as the begining of the sentence noone uses this Gladly, Canada does not make an individual choose between ones culture and Canadian culture in order to fit in. Therefore, with time people have accepted their diversity and they continue to coexist with one another in the heterogeneous Canadian society. is that ok with you ? the structure Muslims feel like they are always being scrutinized by people in public thus creating a sense of self-consciousness. Jamil (2012) stated that individuals already know how what they say or do is perceived by those with negative opinions. Some wrong APA format i made changes in APA.. There are many sentences like the above in the paper plus the writer needs to use another article for the last question Please tell the writer to look at Purdue OWL APA format for the citing things need to be cited properly otherwise its plagerized stats, Indian act of 1982 where did the writer obtain facts of this i changed the whole paper with the citing8/27 3:17 AMthat citation is incorrect and the essay, well the writer didnt do anything. i dont have time http://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/religion-in-canada-is-changing- but-its-not-being-abandoned/article11781056/ i provided all these required readings. last question is not what canada represents. the last question is wrong Module 3 question 2 where is there anythign about muslim french canda and frist nations. http://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/religion-in-canada-is-changing-but-its-not-being-abandoned/article11781056/ Module 3 is worng http://www.ted.com/talks/richard_wilkinson give the writer the attched article and ted talk please Social class and status are two different concepts that sociologists use to refer to stratification in society. Social class refers to an economic position, whereas status is related to the honour and prestige that people hold due to their station in society. People can work towards achieving higher economic and social positions, but in many cases our position in society is ascribed or given to us without our effort or individual choice being involved. We are born with a certain ethnicity, race, sex, and level of abilityand as we go through our lives, things can happen that may change or limit our abilitiesand ageing is inevitable. As you will learn in the following reading, socio-economic inequality has to do with education, occupation, and income, but also with what the authors call ascribed statuses: race, ethnicity, social background, sex, age, and disability. Pay special attention to the different ways by which ascribed status influences the standard of living of Canadians. for module three question 1 inequality Social inequality and stratification in Canada by Eddie Grattan this article to b used Aboriginal SOCI3991_The_reemergence_of_Aboriginal_Govts-1.pdf Module 3 Question 1 SOCI3991_Intersectionality_and_Public_Policy-1.pdf i have attached all this to my download. APA format should be on point Purdue owl APA it is a website and that has proper APA format. 08/29/16, 1.13 AM Please there is a quote he used i need the page number, Also, in the last question (moduel 3), he needs to cite some of the ideas better, last question he has ideas but not cited. ast question in module 3 needs another article from the class, please be sure to use them -Aboriginal SOCI3991_The_reemergence_of_Aboriginal_Govts-1 and last question SOCI3991_An_evolutionary_story-29/1 the revision page 7 and page 9 he writer has inidicated stats 70. 4 percent of women.. where did he get that and also he has quoted something verbatim on Pg 9 but he has not indcated the page number of that quote Also another issue on Pg 9 with written work with aboriginals This discrimination had internal effects within the native community and the nation as a whole. The rather Christian-Canada, that was more French and British dominated, tended to look down upon other religious beliefs and denominations. The indigenous peoples consciousness crystallized and began perceiving the state of affairs as we against them. A section of them admired the western culture and adopted it, later getting the education to fight for the equality of all through Charters. When considering the nation as a whole, this form of discrimination where did the writer get we against them ? where is the page number and the source and as i mentioned again for the hundred time.. i need at least two sources for each question last question has only one source jordan press please rectify this situation thank you.. I dont know how much clear i have to be it is simple Every individual is equal before and under the law and has the right to the equal protection and equal benefit of the law without discrimination and, in particular, without discrimination based on race, national or ethnic origin, color, religion, sex, age or mental or physical disability. (Gebelein, 2000). where is is the page number of this source The banks of St. Lawrence River were later on occupied by the French Roman Catholic Community, subordinating the indigenous groups religious belief. where was this obtained A section of them admired the western culture and adopted it, later getting the education to fight for the equality of all through Charters. When considering the nation as a whole, this form of discrimination undermined multiculturalism and the mutual beneficial co-existence of divergent communities with the single political community. which charters ? what westerd culture they admired this is in last essay page 9 or 10 This discrimination had internal effects within the native community and the nation as a whole. The rather Christian-Canada, that was more French and British dominated, tended to look down upon other religious beliefs and denominations. The indigenous peoples consciousness crystallized and began perceiving the state of affairs as we against them. A section of them admired the western culture and adopted it, later getting the education to fight for the equality of all through Charters. When considering the nation as a whole, this form of discrimination how did this discrimiation have internal effects that is the expectation of the prof and the questions for the modules9/10 12:15am This time its written well however the last two questions doesnt have any articles used and any of the thoughts cited sectionality can be used to theorize issues of oppression and policy formulation to enable people to live peacefully with one another. The term refers to the ways that oppressive institutions such as sexism, ethnicity, ableism, and racism are interwoven such that it is hard to examine each separately from one another. Sexual prejudice in Canada cannot be ignored since it is one of the oppressive practices that have existed for a long time with women being the primary victims. Gender discrimination and oppressive practices have increased poverty in Canada since women are discriminated when it comes to job opportunities. Despite the fact that Canada has registered budget surpluses in the previous eight years, it is still captured by poverty whereby women and children suffer the most, accounting for 2.4 million women (Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women, 2006). This is despite the fact that the country has laws that oppose gender discrimination by protecting everybody from discrimination based on color, sex, race, and age among others. This means that both men and women have equal rights to acquire employment, vote, and participate in all national activities equally to enable them to utilize their full potential. However, women find it difficult to compete favorably with men, especially in leadership positions and job opportunities. Other examples of challenges related to gender include domestic violence and sexual assault, especially on women and children. Apparently, something that has affected most Canadian males and females is the universal model which does not recognize diversity during policy-making. People cannot perform duties at the same rate since their capabilities are different. For instance, incapacitated persons cannot operate at the same speed as other people. Therefore, it is important to acknowledge peoples differences and take them into account when creating and applying policies. General policies are viewed as unproductive since they do not account for the differences in the population they are meant for. Whatever that works for men does not always work for women, hence there is a need to investigate individual differences when formulating policies that aim at achieving quality. Social policies should be structured in a way that targets a particular group of persons to empower them without negatively affecting the other. For instance, laws governing the rights and freedoms for women should not violate those of men, and vice versa. A serious revelation is that marginalized women from the First Nations peoples are often not included in social policy programs, leading to poverty (Rahman, 2013). The First Nations faced several obstacles, which included living in reservations, and the school system that facilitated segregation. The residential schools were built for aboriginal children, and funded by the government to ensure that the parents did not contribute to the cultural, intellectual, and spiritual growth of This whole. Section Term intersectionality refrwes Who referred that who was the author sectionality can be used to theorize issues of oppression and policy formulation to enable people to live peacefully with one another. The term refers to the ways that oppressive institutions such as sexism, ethnicity, ableism, and racism are interwoven such that it is hard to examine each separately from one another. Sexual prejudice in Canada cannot be ignored since it is one of the oppressive practices that have existed for a long time with women being the primary victims. Gender discrimination and oppressive practices have increased poverty in Canada since women are discriminated when it comes to job opportunities. Despite the fact that Canada has registered budget surpluses in the previous eight years, it is still captured by poverty whereby women and children suffer the most, accounting for 2.4 million women (Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women, 2006). This is despite the fact that the country has laws that oppose gender discrimination by protecting everybody from discrimination based on color, sex, race, and age among others. This means that both men and women have equal rights to acquire employment, vote, and participate in all national activities equally to enable them to utilize their full potential. However, women find it difficult to compete favorably with men, especially in leadership positions and job opportunities. Other examples of challenges related to gender include domestic violence and sexual assault, especially on women and children. Apparently, something that has affected most Canadian males and females is the universal model which does not recognize diversity during policy-making. People cannot perform duties at the same rate since their capabilities are different. For instance, incapacitated persons cannot operate at the same speed as other people. Therefore, it is important to acknowledge peoples differences and take them into account when creating and applying policies. General policies are viewed as unproductive since they do not account for the differences in the population they are meant for. Whatever that works for men does not always work for women, hence there is a need to investigate individual differences when formulating policies that aim at achieving quality. Social policies should be structured in a way that targets a particular group of persons to empower them without negatively affecting the other. For instance, laws governing the rights and freedoms for women should not violate those of men, and vice versa. A serious revelation is that marginalized women from the First Nations peoples are often not included in social policy programs, leading to poverty (Rahman, 2013). The First Nations faced several obstacles, which included living in reservations, and the school system that facilitated segregation. The residential schools were built for aboriginal children, and funded by the government to ensure that the parents did not contribute to the cultural, intellectual, and spiritual growth of General policies are viewed as unproductive since they do not account for the differences in the population they are meant for. Whatever that works for men does not always work for women, hence there is a need to investigate individual differences when formulating policies that aim at achieving quality. Social policies should be structured in a way that targets a particular group of persons to empower them without negatively affecting the other. For instance, laws governing the rights and freedoms for women should not violate those of men, and vice versa. A serious revelation is that marginalized women from the First Nations peoples are often not included in social policy programs, leading to poverty (Rahman, 2013). The First Nations faced several obstacles, which included living in reservations, and the school system that facilitated segregation. The residential schools were built for aboriginal children, and funded by the government to ensure that the parents did not contribute to the cultural, intellectual, and spiritual growth of the children. They are continuously being oppressed since the children still feel the impact of the experience in these schools, leading to social problems such as discrimination. There is a need to reanalyze social groups, and ensure that diverse regions are accounted for appropriately. General policies are viewed as unproductive since they do not account for the differences in the population they are meant for. Whatever that works for men does not always work for women, hence there is a need to investigate individual differences when formulating policies that aim at achieving quality. Social policies should be structured in a way that targets a particular group of persons to empower them without negatively affecting the other. For instance, laws governing the rights and freedoms for women should not violate those of men, and vice versa. A serious revelation is that marginalized women from the First Nations peoples are often not included in social policy programs, leading to poverty (Rahman, 2013). The First Nations faced several obstacles, which included living in reservations, and the school system that facilitated segregation. The residential schools were built for aboriginal children, and funded by the government to ensure that the parents did not contribute to the cultural, intellectual, and spiritual growth of the children. They are continuously being oppressed since the children still feel the impact of the experience in these schools, leading to social problems such as discrimination. There is a need to reanalyze social groups, and ensure that diverse regions are accounted for appropriately. General policy what general policy where was this concept obtained from These ideas need to be cited Next question which is last question. Starts with Discrimination of the Aboriginal Community in Canada Racial discrimination against the Aborigines is still rampant, yet there is a law that outlaws discrimination of individuals due to their race of origin. The Aboriginal people have always suffered institutional racism in places of work, schools, and other organizations. Several Australians are affected by racial discrimination and social exclusion with some experiencing it daily in their lives. Various stereotypes are associated with the Aboriginal people in Canada, which aim at depicting them as inferior to the white race. One of them is that they love to depend on others and the state for survival, especially whenever the government tries to protect their rights. This affects their self-determination spirit, and some of them end up believing that they are inferior to the rest of Canadian population. The media is one of the bodies that play a significant role in influencing the perceptions of the Aboriginals to the public. There are various misinterpretations since the media professionals decide the information to air to the public, which may improve or damage the reputation of a particular group. Once the news reports that Aboriginals experience both social and economic problems in Canada more than other groups, the public sees this group as consisting of poor, lazy, uneducated, and unable to perform any important role in the modern society. The media should focus more on discrimination that this group experiences instead of always giving stories of their everyday challenges. Recently, some of the Aboriginal leaders have tried to use the media to call for support for the community to shun embarrassing politics, discriminative treatment, and urge the media to only air accurate information. However, the colonial stereotypes still influence the attitudes of several Canadians towards this indigenous community. They are blamed for failing to evolve and become modernized just as the rest of the popul Where was this obtained ? How does the writer know discrimination occurs against aboriginals Again documentation and citation is needed That whole section needs citation One writer used filthy while discussing Muslims Yes thats fine. Did my critique make sense Ideas and concepts must be cited Thanks and all articles I have provided must be used Each question should have 1 more article other than class readings I have proved I was also informed that the writer does own research as well . Yeas they need to used plus other ones the writer researchers Its also in the questions I provided with profs expectation Make sure the writer reads the assignment expection I sent It has the questions and what prof expects And ideas and concepts must be cited in Apa Correct Apa citing is found on Purdue owl apa================================================================ 9/23/16 5:42 PM again there is citing issues articles i provided was not used USE THE ARTICLES FROM MY CLASS IN MODULE 3!!! CHECK THE FILE NEW_TO_USE_74598-new and correct the mistakes09/26 The main issues are:Citations, the sources are not properly cited or not cited at all in many cases. All critical points should be cited.Grammar: check all the sentences, many of them have a strange structure, there are a lot of typos.Articles: not all class readings were used, you need to use extra articles (like peer reviewed journal articles, research articles) for each questions.2 modules, 2 questions each.Please avoid the intolerance, there should be no blacks in the text. All nationalities should be written correctly.Check the flow of the paper, the sentences should be connected.Do not write that Canada is boasting.DescriptionRevisionthere are two modules which consist of 2 questions. I will be providing class reading materials. Additional research is required . Please read all the files and make a research. I will attach Professors instructions and expectations. Please MAKE CITATIONS as per the format.Record: 1Title: Fireworks, Folk-dancing, and Fostering a National Identity: The Politics of Canada Day. Authors: Hayday, Matthew Source: Canadian Historical Review; Jun2010, Vol. 91 Issue 2, p287-314, 28p Publication Year: 2010 Subject Terms: CANADA Day POLITICS & culture HOLIDAYS Canada CANADA Anniversaries, etc. CANADIAN national characteristics GROUP identity PUBLIC policy (Law) MULTICULTURALISM CANADA Politics & government 1945- Geographic Terms: CANADA Author-Supplied Keywords: Canada Day commmoration commemoration Dominion Day fete du Canada fete du Dominion nationalism nationalisme politique publique public policy Abstract (English): Since 1958, the Canadian government has used the celebration of 1 July to promote particular models of national identity and to foster national unity. Commemorating the anniversary of Confederation, these Dominion Day and Canada Day (as renamed in 1982) observances changed over the decades to reflect changing government public policy objectives and new conceptions of the nation. From a celebration rooted in military pageantry stressing Canadas British heritage, these events were modified to promote a vision of a multicultural, bilingual country with a strong Aboriginal component. Moreover, Canada Day messages increasingly stressed the themes of individual achievement and respect for diversity. Although politicians played roles in determining the form and content of these events, and public response influenced which components were maintained, bureaucrats working in the Secretary of State department exercised a particularly strong influence on these celebrations, providing institutional continuity and expertise to planning efforts. These celebrations provide a key window into understanding the Canadian governments evolving cultural and national identity policies in the postSecond World War era. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Abstract (French): Rsum : Le gouvernement canadien utilise depuis 1958 les clbrations du 1er juillet pour promouvoir lidentit nationale, avec des modles particuliers. La commmoration de lanniversaire de la Confdration, ces clbrations de la fte du Dominion, renomme fte du Canada en 1982, a chang au cours des dcennies afin de reflter la politique publique gouvernementale en mouvement et les nouvelles conceptions de la nation. Dune clbration enracine dans un spectacle militaire insistant sur lhritage britannique du Canada, on a modifi ces vnements afin de promouvoir une vision dun pays bilingue et multiculturel, dot dune composante fortement autochtone. En outre, les messages de la fte du Canada portaient de plus en plus sur les thmes des ralisations individuelles et le respect de la diversit. Bien que les hommes et les femmes politiques aient jou un rle dans la dtermination de la forme et du contenu de ces vnements, et que laccueil de la population ait eu une influence sur les lments conservs, les bureaucrates travaillant au Secrtariat dtat ont exerc une influence particulirement forte sur ces clbrations, en offrant une continuit institutionnelle et leur expertise en planification. Ces clbrations permettent de mieux comprendre les politiques en pleine volution de lidentit nationale et culturelle du gouvernement canadien aprs la Seconde Guerre mondiale. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Canadian Historical Review is the property of University of Toronto Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holders express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.) ISSN: 00083755 Accession Number: 50394939Persistent link to this record (Permalink): http://ezproxy.tru.ca/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edb&AN=50394939&site=eds-liveCut and Paste: Fireworks, Folk-dancing, and Fostering a National Identity: The Politics of Canada Day.Database: Publisher Provided Full Text Searching FileRecord: 1Title: Shifting Sands? Citizens National Identities and Pride in Social Security in Canada. Authors: Raney, Tracey Berdahl, Loleen Source: American Review of Canadian Studies; Sep2011, Vol. 41 Issue 3, p259-273, 15p Publication Year: 2011 Subject Terms: NATIONALISM Canada WELFARE state POLITICAL attitudes SOCIAL security Canada SOCIAL psychology CANADA Social policy CANADA Politics & government 1980- Geographic Terms: CANADA Author-Supplied Keywords: Canada national identity social policy social psychology welfare state NAICS/Industry Codes: NAICS/Industry Codes 541910 Marketing Research and Public Opinion Polling 911910 Other federal government public administration Abstract: While the use of public policy to construct a Canadian identity has been established in the literature, what is less well understood is whether national identity, once established, might shape Canadians feelings about these same public policies. This article examines the extent to which citizens national identities influence their pride in Canadas social security system, and how this relationship may be changing over time. Using data from the International Social Science Programmes 1995 and 2003 National Identity Modules, the article argues that citizens national identities help explain the contours of social security attitudes in Canada, and that this relationship persists despite significant policy change in the field. Additionally, the paper suggests that political actors may successfully increase public support for their social security policies by framing them in ways that appeal to citizens definitions of Canada. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER] Copyright of American Review of Canadian Studies is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holders express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.) ISSN: 02722011 Accession Number: 65125705Persistent link to this record (Permalink): http://ezproxy.tru.ca/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edb&AN=65125705&site=eds-liveCut and Paste: Shifting Sands? Citizens National Identities and Pride in Social Security in Canada.Database: Publisher Provided Full Text Searching FileRecord: 1Title: Us, Them, and Others: Reflections on Canadian Multiculturalism and National Identity at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century. Authors: Winter, Elke Source: Canadian Review of Sociology; May2014, Vol. 51 Issue 2, p128-151, 24p Publication Year: 2014 Subject Terms: MULTICULTURALISM Canada CANADIAN national characteristics NATIONALISM Canada CANADA Social conditions 1991- Reviews & Products: US, Them & Others: Pluralism & National Identity in Diverse Societies (Book) Abstract (English): The John Porter Lecture at the annual meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association in Victoria 2013 draws upon my book Us, Them, and Others: Pluralism and National Identity in Diverse Societies. Incorporating the findings from an analysis of Canadian English-language newspaper discourses during the 1990s into a theoretical framework inspired by Weberian sociology, the book argues that pluralism is best understood as a dynamic set of triangular relations where the compromise between unequal groups-us and others-is rendered meaningful through the confrontation with real or imagined outsiders (them). The lecture summarizes the theoretical contribution and explains how multiculturalism became consolidated in dominant Canadian discourses in the late 1990s. The lecture then discusses changes to Canadian multicultural identity at the beginning of the twenty-first century. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Abstract (French): La Confrence John Porter, effectue lors de la rencontre annuelle de la Socit canadienne de sociologie Victoria en 2013, se base sur le livre Us, Them and Others : Pluralism and National Identity in Diverse Societies (Winter, 2011). En intgrant les rsultats dune analyse discursive des journaux canadiens en langue anglaise pendant les annes 1990, et travers un cadre thorique inspir de la sociologie wbrienne, le livre propose denvisager le pluralisme comme une srie de relations triangulaires dynamiques, o le compromis entre des groupes ingaux us et other- est amen faire sens cause de la confrontation avec lautrui rel ou imagin (them). La confrence dbute par un rsum de la contribution thorique, puis explique comment le multiculturalisme a t consolid en tant que discours dominant au Canada dans les annes 1990. Par la suite, les changements subis par lidentit canadienne multiculturelle au dbut du 21e sicle sont discuts. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Canadian Review of Sociology is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holders express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.) ISSN: 17556171 Accession Number: 95561796Persistent link to this record (Permalink): http://ezproxy.tru.ca/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edb&AN=95561796&site=eds-liveCut and Paste: Us, Them, and Others: Reflections on Canadian Multiculturalism and National Identity at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century.

Place your order
(550 words)

Approximate price: $22

Calculate the price of your order

550 words
We'll send you the first draft for approval by September 11, 2018 at 10:52 AM
Total price:
$26
The price is based on these factors:
Academic level
Number of pages
Urgency
Basic features
  • Free title page and bibliography
  • Unlimited revisions
  • Plagiarism-free guarantee
  • Money-back guarantee
  • 24/7 support
On-demand options
  • Writer’s samples
  • Part-by-part delivery
  • Overnight delivery
  • Copies of used sources
  • Expert Proofreading
Paper format
  • 275 words per page
  • 12 pt Arial/Times New Roman
  • Double line spacing
  • Any citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago/Turabian, Harvard)

Our guarantees

Delivering a high-quality product at a reasonable price is not enough anymore.
That’s why we have developed 5 beneficial guarantees that will make your experience with our service enjoyable, easy, and safe.

Money-back guarantee

You have to be 100% sure of the quality of your product to give a money-back guarantee. This describes us perfectly. Make sure that this guarantee is totally transparent.

Read more

Zero-plagiarism guarantee

Each paper is composed from scratch, according to your instructions. It is then checked by our plagiarism-detection software. There is no gap where plagiarism could squeeze in.

Read more

Free-revision policy

Thanks to our free revisions, there is no way for you to be unsatisfied. We will work on your paper until you are completely happy with the result.

Read more

Privacy policy

Your email is safe, as we store it according to international data protection rules. Your bank details are secure, as we use only reliable payment systems.

Read more

Fair-cooperation guarantee

By sending us your money, you buy the service we provide. Check out our terms and conditions if you prefer business talks to be laid out in official language.

Read more