Conflict Management

Week 5: Conflict Management, Civility, Collegiality: Anticipating and Managing Conflict   Ife J. Cauley, RN, BSN Walden University NURS 6351 Dr. Wendy Ostendorf December 28, 2020 Introduction In nursing education, civility is identified as having “respect for one another and honoring differences, listening and seeking common ground, and engaging in social discourse and appreciating its relevance,” (Ekaa and Chambers, 2019,p. 45). The purpose of this discussion is to post three created scenarios and propose strategies to minimize and manage instances of incivility. Nurse educators must promote social change by promoting civility in nursing education (Ekaa and Chambers, 2019).  Based on the topics provided in the Learning Resources, create a scenario that could potentially arise in your professional setting in which students are in conflict with one another. During debriefing, two nursing students become enraged at each other. The conflict has arisen from an assigned project, and Student A does not believe Student B is pulling her weight. Student A claims that she felt as if she was doing the majority of the project, with Student B missing deadlines that they mutually agreed upon. Student B states she is going through some personal problems at home; she asked Student A for more time to complete her portion of the project. Student B says that Student A is being unreasonable, unrealistic, and mean.  Solution: The instructor asks to speak to both students in confidence. The instructor allows for Student A to vent her frustrations first. She says she feels as if she is nearly responsible for completing the entire project, and that Student B is not keeping up with deadlines. Student A says every time she tries to call or text Student B about the project, she either does not answer or tells her she can not talk. Students B begins to cry, and says that her and her husband have decided to separate. She admits she should be doing more for school, but her home life has been consuming her. Student B says she was too embarrassed to tell others about her pending separation, and she is considering withdrawing from school. Student A now feels terrible, and sympathetically holds Student B’s hand and apologizes to her. The instructor commends both students for settling their differences, and encourages Student B to stay in school if her circumstances allow. The instructor also says since the project is not due for another month, both students should continue to work together and be patient with one another. The instructor encourages Student B to seek the Student Assistance Program (SAP) for her mental health. The instructor, and eventually both students, demonstrated respect, dignity, collegiality, and kindness (Evans, 2017). Both students took personal responsibility for their own actions (Evans, 2017). Based on the topics provided in the Learning Resources, create another scenario that could potentially arise in your professional setting in which an instructor and student are in conflict with one another. The instructor has assigned each student two weeks prior to a research project. As the instructor is grading the projects, he notices that Student C’s report is nearly 100% plagiarized (Jiang et al., 2017). This is not the first time Student C has been warned about assignments that have been copied from other sources. The instructor emails the student and asks him to please rewrite the assignment in his own words. The student refuses, and emails the instructor back and says, “I am a single father of three and I do not have time to rewrite anything! Can’t you just make this ONE exception? The reason this may look “plagiarized” is because you give us too many assignments, and I have to work full-time. I am an honest, hardworking family man that is just trying to get an education and you are single‐handedly trying to ruin my life!’ (Jiang et al., 2017). The instructor is dumbfounded and choses not to respond to the student.  Solution: Jiang et al. (2017) defines academic entitlement (AE) as a relatively stable belief that one should receive academic success, regardless of performance. In the above scenario, the AE behavior is not to take personal responsibility for one’s performance (Jiang et al., 2017). In other words, when the student did not get what he wanted, he blamed the instructor for his poor performance (Jiang et al., 2017). A hearing must be held between the department chair, instructor, and student. This student will face some type of disciplinary action.  Based on the topics provided in the Learning Resources, create another scenario that could arise in your professional setting in which an instructor and colleague are in conflict (have opposing views) with one another. Instructor Nice has learned that other local universities have changed their grading system during this pandemic for more nursing students to pass. A passing grade at this facility is a 75 or better; other institutions have lowered the passing grade to 60. While Instructor Nice believes that a grade of 60 as passing is too low, she does believe the current institution should lower the passing grade to accommodate more students. Instructor Nice takes this proposal to her Colleague Rigid. Colleague Rigid still believes that a grade of 75 should be used; pandemic or not. In her opinion, a grade of 75 ensures that the students have mastered most nursing knowledge. Colleague Rigid said only the strongest students will survive this viral holocaust, so the grading system will not change. Instructor Nice disagrees and tells Colleague Rigid she is being too stubborn, uncaring, and rigid.  Solution:  A meeting with the department chair is the best way to handle this situation. Both instructors have a point, but both need to be reminded that they must stay professional. After thorough research, the chair learns local colleges are accepting a lower passing grade. A vote is conducted, and the new passing grade is set at 70. 70 is determined to be more than reasonable to accommodate students during this pandemic. These colleagues used the integrating style of conflict management to resolve this issue; this style involves openness, exchange of information, and examination of differences to reach an effective solution acceptable to both parties (Başoğul & Gönül, 2016). It is associated with problem solving, which may lead to creative solutions (Başoğul & Gönül, 2016). Conclusion In conclusion, civility must be promoted in the clinical setting and every aspect of our lives. Nurse educators, students, and other colleagues must work diligently to resolve issues. If respect is given, it can also be reciprocated.    References Başoğul, C. & Gönül, O. (2016). Role of emotional intelligence in conflict management  strategies of nurses. Asian Nursing Research, 10(3), 228-233. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anr.2016.07.002 Ekaa, N. & Chambers, D. (2019). Incivility in nursing education: A systematic literature review.  Nurse Education in Practice, 39, 45-54.  Evans, G. (2017). Training for toxic work culture should start in nursing school: Prepare for  incivility, bullying, and violence. Hospital Employee Health, 36(5), 49-52.  Jiang, L., Tripp, T.M., & Hong, P.Y.  (2017). College instruction is not so stress free after all: A  qualitative and quantitative study of academic entitlement, uncivil behaviors, and instructor strain and burnout. Stress and Health, 33(5), 578-589.  https://doi.org/10.1002/smi.2742 Wk 5 Main Post 6351          Healthcare is a high-stress field. Multiple personalities coming together during intense life or death situations is bound to cause conflict from time to time. Hostility can range from verbal altercations and disagreements to major outbursts and even physical violence. (Ramsay, 2001) A hostile work environment affects productivity, turnover, patient care, and overall morale. It is important for every nurse to understand how to manage conflict regardless of what position they hold. (Ramsay, 2001)As nurse educators not only will they have to manage it on a personal level, but teach others to as well.            Nurse educators may find themselves in certain hostile scenarios. One of these includes students in conflict with one another. For example, one student may feel that they are not pulling their fair share of the work in a group project. Educators can act as a mediator by calling the group together and trying a few different strategies.            The first is to make sure communication and expectations are clear. The students should all be given the rubric which they will be graded by and the educator can make sure there are no questions concerning the assignment. This will ensure the student wasn’t doing their part just because they didn’t understand. (Huang, 2018)Second, while the students are together they can work out a communication schedule. What is the best time each student can be reached? What is their preferred method of communication? (Huang, 2018)It is important that nursing students understand that conflict will not end in school and being taught how to handle it rather than just solving the problem for them is a necessary skill in becoming a professional nurse. (Mileva, 1987)           Another scenario that educators may encounter is when a student is having an issue with them. A student may become upset or hostile if they feel the instructor gave them a grade that was unfair or an assignment that was to difficult to complete. There are a few tactics that should be used in this situation.          First, it to set clear expectations of respect. A student can voice a grievance as long as it is done in a respectful way. It is important the educator does not respond defensively. If a student makes the comment “ this is stupid” the educator must take this as a personal attack. (Carnegie Mellon University, 2020)Next, there should be ground rules placed for both parties. The educator should respond immediately to the complaint or behavior and detail that certain behaviors will not be tolerated. For example, commanding, challenging, and being condescending. (McKibben, 2017) Once that is understood listening to the student’s frustration and explaining the reason for the grade and what they can do in the future to improve. It is important that the educator’s expectations are realistic and achievable.(Carnegie Mellon University, 2020)         Lastly, another area of conflict that may arise is between an educator and a colleague. Educators may disagree about the curriculum or the way to teach certain aspects of a lesson. If this were to happen educators could avoid the situation turning hostile by focusing on the problem, not the person, and keeping the students the center of attention. (Tingley, n.d.) Another huge way to reduce the hostility is by keeping the issues between you and the co-worker. Nothing negative should be said to other colleagues. It will only increase stress and resentment, decreasing the chance that a comparable solution will be reached. (Tingley, n.d.)            Conflict is inevitable in all stages of life. As a student, a nurse, an educator, conflict is bound to happen. Conflict in itself is not the problem, it is how the conflict is handled that can be the issue. It is important to remember that above all else nurses are professionals this must be maintained even in times of stress and disagreement. Setting personal agendas aside and focusing on the problem with composure and ground rules will help generate solutions and decrease escalating violence.    References Carnegie Mellon University. (2020). Students are intentionally challenging the instructors authority. Eberly Center. https://www.cmu.edu/teaching/solveproblem/strat-behaverudely/behaverudely-05.html Huang, L. (2018, September 19). Group work strategies to ensure students pull their weight. Faculty Focus | Higher Ed Teaching. https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/effective-teaching-strategies/students-riding-coattails-group-work-five-simple-ideas-try/ McKibben, L. (2017). Conflict management: Importance and implications. British Journal of Nursing, 26(2), 100–103. https://doi.org/10.12968/bjon.2017.26.2.100 Mileva, S. (1987). Teaching conflict resolution [PDF]. Nurse Educator. https://journals.lww.com/nurseeducatoronline/Abstract/1987/07000/Teaching_Conflict_Resolution.9.aspx Ramsay, M. E. (2001). Conflict in the health care workplace. Baylor University Medical Center Proceedings, 14(2), 138–139. https://doi.org/10.1080/08998280.2001.11927749 Tingley, S. (n.d.). Dealing with conflicts in school: Advice from a former principal. Hey Teach!. https://www.wgu.edu/heyteach/article/dealing-teacher-conflicts-school-advice-former-principal1710.html Learning Resources Required Readings (click to expand/reduce) Cannon, S. (2016). Classroom educational experiences. In S. Cannon & C. Boswell (Eds.), Evidence-based teaching in nursing: A foundation for educators (2nd ed., pp. 155–174). Jones & Bartlett Learning. Arveklev, S. H., Berg, L., Wigert, H., Morrison-Helme, M., Teach, G. D., & Lepp, M. (2018). Learning about conflict and conflict management through drama in nursing education. Journal of Nursing Education, 57(4), 209–216. Beserra, E. P., do Amaral Gubert, F., Martins, M. C., Vasconcelos, V. M., de Figueiredo, G. A., da Silva, L. A., & de Lima, M. A. (2018). Conflict management in nurse training. Journal of Nursing UFPE, 12(10), 2891–2896. Clark, C. M. (2017). An evidence-based approach to integrate civility, professionalism, and ethical practice into nursing curricula. Nurse Educator, 42(3), 120–126. Eka, N. G. A., & Chambers, D. (2019). Incivility in nursing education: A systematic literature review. Nurse Education in Practice, 39, 45–54. Evans, G. (2017). Training for toxic work culture should start in nursing school. Hospital Employee Health, 36(5), 49–52. Credit Line: Training for toxic work culture should start in nursing school by Evans, G., in Hospital Employee Health, Vol. 36/ Issue 5. Copyright 2017 by Relias Media. Reprinted by permission of Relias Media via the Copyright Clearance Center. McComb, S. A., & Kirkpatrick, J. M. (2017). Infusing systems and quality improvement throughout an undergraduate nursing curriculum. Journal of Nursing Education, 56(12), 752–757. Phillips, J. M., & Stalter, A. M. (2018). Using systems thinking to advance global health engagement in education and practice. Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 49(4), 154–156. Plack, M. M., Goldman, E. F., Scott, A. R., Pintz, C., Herrmann, D., Kline, K., Thompson, T. & Brundage, S. B. (2018). Systems thinking and systems-based practice across the health professions: An inquiry into definitions, teaching practices, and assessment teaching and learning in medicine. Teaching and Learning in Medicine: An International Journal, 30(3), 242–254.  Required Media (click to expand/reduce) Walden University (Producer). (2020). Building and managing professional relationships [Video]. Walden University Blackboard.   Building and Managing Professional Relationships Dr. Terry Valiga shares best practices for building and managing professional relationships. Strategies for handling workplace conflict are also discussed. (9 m). Accessible player  –Downloads– Download Video w/CC Download Audio Download Transcript Optional Resources (click to expand/reduce) Alexander, S. (2017). Promoting civility in education and practice. Clinical Nurse Specialist: The Journal for Advanced Nursing Practice, 31(2), 79–81.  Phillips, J. M., Stalter, A. M., Goldschmidt, K. A., Ruggiero, J. S., Brodhead, J., Bonnett, P. L., Provencio, R. A., Mckay, M., Jowell, V., Merriam, D. H., Wiggs, C. M., & Scardaville, D. L. (2019). Using systems thinking to implement the QSEN informatics competency. Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 50(9), 392–397.  Blake, N., & Collins, M. (2017). Importance of healthy work environment education in nursing schools. AACN Advanced Critical Care, 28(3), 289–290. Krautscheid, L. C., Luebbering, C. M., & Krautscheid, B. A. (2017). Conflict-handling styles demonstrated by nursing students in response to microethical dilemmas. Nursing Education Perspectives, 38(3), 143–145. Phillips, J. M., & Stalter, A. M. (2016). Integrating systems thinking into nursing education. Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 47(9), 395–397. Stalter, A. M., Phillips, J. M., Ruggiero, J. S., Scardaville, D. L., Merriam, D., Dolansky, M. A., Goldschmidt, K. A., Wiggs, C. M. & Winegardner, S. (2017). A concept analysis of systems thinking. Nursing Forum, 52(4), 323–330.  Select Grid View or List View to change the rubric’s layout. Name: NURS_6351_Week_5_Discussion_Rubric Grid View List View   Excellent Good Fair Poor Main Posting 45 (45%) – 50 (50%) Answers all parts of the discussion question(s) expectations with reflective critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module and current credible sources. Supported by at least three current, credible sources. Written clearly and concisely with no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style. 40 (40%) – 44 (44%) Responds to the discussion question(s) and is reflective with critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module. At least 75% of post has exceptional depth and breadth. Supported by at least three credible sources. Written clearly and concisely with one or no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style. 35 (35%) – 39 (39%) Responds to some of the discussion question(s). One or two criteria are not addressed or are superficially addressed. Is somewhat lacking reflection and critical analysis and synthesis. Somewhat represents knowledge gained from the course readings for the module. Post is cited with two credible sources. Written somewhat concisely; may contain more than two spelling or grammatical errors. Contains some APA formatting errors. 0 (0%) – 34 (34%) Does not respond to the discussion question(s) adequately. Lacks depth or superficially addresses criteria. Lacks reflection and critical analysis and synthesis. Does not represent knowledge gained from the course readings for the module. Contains only one or no credible sources. Not written clearly or concisely. Contains more than two spelling or grammatical errors. Does not adhere to current APA manual writing rules and style. Main Post: Timeliness 10 (10%) – 10 (10%) Posts main post by Day 3. 0 (0%) – 0 (0%) N/A 0 (0%) – 0 (0%) N/A 0 (0%) – 0 (0%) Does not post main post by Day 3. First Response 17 (17%) – 18 (18%) Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings. Responds fully to questions posed by faculty. Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources. Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives. Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues. Response is effectively written in standard, edited English. 15 (15%) – 16 (16%) Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings. Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues. Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed. Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources. Response is effectively written in standard, edited English. 13 (13%) – 14 (14%) Response is on topic and may have some depth. Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication. Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed. Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited. 0 (0%) – 12 (12%) Response may not be on topic and lacks depth. Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication. Responses to faculty questions are missing. No credible sources are cited. Second Response 16 (16%) – 17 (17%) Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings. Responds fully to questions posed by faculty. Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources. Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives. Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues. Response is effectively written in standard, edited English. 14 (14%) – 15 (15%) Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings. Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues. Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed. Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources. Response is effectively written in standard, edited English. 12 (12%) – 13 (13%) Response is on topic and may have some depth. Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication. Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed. Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited. 0 (0%) – 11 (11%) Response may not be on topic and lacks depth. Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication. Responses to faculty questions are missing. No credible sources are cited. Participation 5 (5%) – 5 (5%) Meets requirements for participation by posting on three different days. 0 (0%) – 0 (0%) N/A 0 (0%) – 0 (0%) N/A 0 (0%) – 0 (0%) Does not meet requirements for participation by posting on three different days. Total Points: 100 Name: NURS_6351_Week_5_Discussion_Rubric REPLY QUOTE EMAIL AUTHOR

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